The Star Property Fair 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

PETALING JAYA: About 20 developers and property-related companies will showcase their projects and management services at The Star Property Fair 2011 from Nov 25-27 at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre.

They comprise some of Malaysia’s most well-known developers like Dijaya Corp Bhd, Sime Darby Property Bhd, Mah Sing Properties Sdn Bhd, Naza TTDI Sdn Bhd, Encorp Bhd, Setia Haruman Sdn Bhd, OSK Property Holdings Bhd, Sunway City Bhd, IOI Properties Bhd and Ivory Properties Group Bhd.

This is the third year Star Publications (M) Bhd is hosting the fair. Last year, the event attracted about 20,000 visitors.

Executive for events management Ian Qua said property investment continued to attract a lot of interest despite the global economic uncertainties. “Based on last year’s numbers, we expect about 20,000 visitors (this year).

“This will be a good place to start for first-time property buyers as it will be an educational experience for them. For those who have made purchases previously, this will be a good event to go as the country’s major developers will congregate at the convention centre. Much time and effort will be saved for housebuyers as they will be able to compare the different offerings and pricing,” he said.

As for the developers, Qua said they would be assured of a constant stream of visitors.

“It will be a win-win situation for both housebuyers and developers and those offering property-related services,” he said.

To make the event more interesting, there will be talks on feng shui, property investment and other topics at selected times during the three days.

Two popular feng shui masters – David Koh and Joe Choo – will share their insights, knowledge and experiences on various interesting topics with potential investors and house owners.

Gavin Tee will talk about why property purchases continue to be one the most popular forms of investment in today’s economic climate.

Other speakers will discuss how the global economy impacts the property market.

Source: The Star